The Ticket by Alice Ruvane ’86

Alice Ruvane ’86 makes her way in the world as a promotional writer. She served on the Editorial Board of The Lyon Review during its inception and her first published personal essay, Creating a Life appeared in The Lyon Review in May 2011. Alice’s other works can be found online and in a yellowing copy of the New York Times Magazine (letter to the Editor and www.poetsagainstthewar.org, Truth & Justice.) Alice lives in Maine where she delights in spoiling her dog and her husband rotten (in that order). When she’s not spending time outdoors, on her yoga mat, on stage or with friends, she can be found at her desk writing. It’s no wonder she’s still at work on her first novel.

I didn’t tell my boy where we were headed the morning I threw his duffle bag in the way back and drove him to rehab. I lied. I waved the plane ticket I’d bought to Canada in front of his dazed eyes, “Maybe your father can straighten you out.” I’d had enough. Even if my boy hadn’t reached his “bottom,” I’d sure reached mine.

I packed his things the night before. Four pairs of tube socks, two pairs of jeans, an assortment of T-shirts and a sweatshirt. It wasn’t much, but it was clean. I picked the clothes off his floor and did the washing, drying and folding. He wasn’t home, but that wasn’t news. For the last two years he only came home to sleep, or really, to sleep it off.

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Poetry: The Stimson Room

Adeline Carrie Koscher ’97 writes poetry and fiction mostly in her sleep and while running or kayaking. Sadly, whole novels have been lost this way. Some of the surviving texts are “Shadows,” a short story included in Altered States Sci-Fi and Fantasy Stories About Change, edited by Amy Locklin, published by Main Street Rag; “Reverie at the Big Y,” a short story published in ninepatch: A Creative Journal for Women and Gender Studies; and poems, “The Ludlow Mills” and “Flotsam,” published in Review Americana. She earned a B.A. in English from MHC, M.Ed. in education from UMASS, and Ph.D. in English with a focus on the New Woman novelist from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland. She visits the Stimson Room at least once a year.

The Stimson Room, Mount Holyoke College

no choice but to grant her space,
crown her with sky,
~ Rita Dove

Give me the Stimson Room, October afternoon –
iron-rimmed window pushed open,
day’s breath between pages,
marigold sunlight around brick corners –
enter the recesses of the room:

here, I fall in love
with H.D. and Mina Loy, Vincent Millay, Rita Dove,
with words and sound and language;
fall in love with the torn photograph
of women, of these pages, of this room;

escape calculus, politics, reason;
slip from consciousness – meet her,
crown her with sky, for she is one of the many,
and she is each of us, seeking not
bowed-head, demur smile, vacant eye –

I wake, I read, I nod, I am born.

 

Poem: The Stillness of the Morning

Cathy Melesky Dante, 94′, is an aspiring poet and writer. She has previously published a prayer for the Catholic Climate Covenant (catholicclimatecovenant.org).

The Stillness of the Morning In Three Parts

I.
Cicadas and katydids sing
their heat-woven songs with
bursting-forth energy
that pulses rhythm
through the morning air.

Voices, people chime
in succinct steps with
words as lovely and harsh
as daisies in the sun.

O, to pick a bouquet
of word flowers, each
petal with a letter
or two or three until
a whole new meaning blooms.

If I could just pick the words
so similarly hued as to
complement, make beautiful the
simplest of gardens.  Then
my poetry might bloom, too,
with beauty and ease.

Pick them quick before
they darken and die, seen
out of context and viewed
through sterile glass screens and vases
that don’t hold nearly
enough water to sustain.

Pick them, that their blooms might
bring hope to those lonely
and afraid.

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